While there are numerous OSHA regulations that requires facilities to maintain written safety programs, many of you may be unaware of exactly which programs you are required to maintain. You may ask yourself “Do I need to have a written program for every single OSHA regulation?” One thing that is good to ask yourself is are you confident and prepared if OSHA visits your facility and inspects your safety programs? This list of safety programs and some of the aspects that are required to be outlined in them should provide guidance on what to keep in mind when deciding how to prioritize your safety programs. Continue reading “5 Must Have Safety Programs”

Many people in general industry are all too familiar with some of the vague or confusing requirements in OSHA’s lockout/tagout regulation 1910.147. In my years working with Conversion Technology, and visiting all sorts of different manufacturing sectors, there have been several mistakes and misconceptions regarding lockout/tagout that have popped up. Continue reading “8 Mistakes to Avoid to Ensure an Effective Lockout/Tagout Program”

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule to protect workers from exposure to respirable crystalline silica. The rule is comprised of two standards, one for Construction (1926.1153) and one for General Industry (1910.1053). Before going into the details of the final rules, here is a review of what crystalline silica is and why a new rule governing exposure to it is being pushed out. Continue reading “OSHA Releases Final Rule on Silica Exposure Requirements”

It feels like we have been talking about the enacting of the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for years, probably because we have been discussing the different aspects and implementation plans since it came out in 2012. The last deadline for compliance with this regulation is almost here. With the three-year transition period for full implementation of this regulation ending on June 1, 2016, this standard and its components should be at the fore front of our minds. Continue reading “Final GHS Deadline Is Almost Here!”

Many people feel that if they see an exposed pinch point or a piece of equipment that poses a potential amputation hazard, they say to themselves “Oh I will just put a guard over that piece of machinery.” As many of facilities already know, it is not always as easy as that. It is a common practice for a facility to outsource the manufacturing of machine guards. This is done for multiple reasons, the most prevalent being an incomplete understanding, or lack confidence in one’s understanding, of OSHA guarding requirements, cost of proper guarding, and the time required to ensure proper guarding. Continue reading “Custom Machine Guards VS. Store Bought Guards”

By Chris Frendahl

Your facility’s Lockout/Tagout program is essential in ensuring employee safety while performing maintenance on energized equipment. Countless workplace fatalities and severe injuries have resulted from improper Lockout/Tagout procedures. OSHA regulations listed in 29 CFR 1910.147 requires all industrial facilities to develop and maintain a written Lockout/Tagout program that lists procedures for safely isolating equipment from all energy sources prior to servicing the equipment.  Here are 3 tips for ensuring that your Lockout/Tagout program is effective and compliant with OSHA regulations. Continue reading “Is Your Lockout/Tagout Program Effective? Three Tips to Developing a Compliant Program”

Adam Haroz, EIT

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) is getting more stringent, both with regulations and enforcement, on machine guarding violations. They are targeting industries with higher risks of potential injuries from machinery. Despite this move by OSHA towards greater expectations from industry, there is still a large cultural gap between employers and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) regarding who is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the machinery is guarded in compliance with OSHA regulations. Continue reading ““But It Came That Way”: The Roles, Responsibilities, and Accountability of Machine Guarding”

As of January 1st, 2015, the updated standards for injury & illness reporting officially came into effect. There are some slight changes to the standard that affect a large number of employers.

Under the old rule, employers were required to notify OSHA only of workplace fatalities or if three or more employees had to go to the hospital due to workplace injury or illness. According to the updated standard, employers must notify OSHA of the following: Continue reading “OSHA’s New Incident Reporting Requirements”