For several years, NFPA has been working to develop NFPA 652, Fundamentals of Combustible Dust. According to Guy Colonna’s recent article in NFPA Journal, the standard is due out this summer(1). This standard will be an overarching standard that applies to all facilities where combustible dust or particulate solids are present. CTI will provide detailed information once the final standard is released. Brian Edwards, PE of CTI has attended the development meetings for that standard, and he is available to answer any questions you may have about the new standard, or the existing, industry-specific standards.

(1) Colonna, Guy. (2015). ‘Credible Risk’. NFPA Journal, March/April 2015, pgs. 60-65

NFPA 652, Standard on Fundamentals of Combustible Dust is a new combustible dust standard that is currently under development by the National Fire Protection Association’s Fundamentals of Combustible Dusts Committee. The committee will be holding its second Draft Meeting in St. Petersburg, FL, which Brian Edwards, PE will be attending to learn more about the direction of the standard.

In its current form, NFPA 652 is designed to be the single standard that will be used in addressing general combustible dust compliance at facilities. It will be the standard that all of the industry specific standards cite in regards to providing the specific properties and tests for determining whether a dust is combustible, as well as requirements for collection of the samples. Continue reading “New NFPA 652: Standard on Combustible Dust”

Flame resistant clothing (FRC) has been used for years in a number of industries to protect workers from flash fires, arc flash, embers, molten metal, and other potential sources of ignition to clothing.  The reason FRC is so important is that many fatalities have occurred because a worker’s clothing has caught on fire, exposing him/her to burning heat for a much longer time than would have occurred during the initial event (e.g. arc flash, vapor flash fire).  Continue reading “Conversion Technology engineers to wear FRC when conducting Combustible Dust Hazard Analysis”

Over the Summer of 2012, Brian Edwards, PE, Director of Engineering for CTI, had the opportunity to speak at 5 regional conferences of the OSHA Voluntary Protection Program Participants Association (VPPPA), as well as the 2012 National VPPPA conference.   Video from the Region 4 conference in Chattanooga, TN has been posted on Youtube.

[embedyt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFi-RwNLkLM[/embedyt]

Please check out the presentation here:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFi-RwNLkLM

I will be speaking on Combustible Dust Safety at the following conferences:

  • Region 8 VPPPA 2012 Conference (May 2-3 @ Greenwood Village, Colorado) – website
  • Region 7 VPPPA 2012 Conference (May 8-9 @ Des Moines, Iowa) – website
  • Region 6 VPPPA 2012 Conference (May 17-18 @ Fort Worth, Texas) – website
  • Region 1 VPPPA 2012 Conference (June 11-13 @ Killington, Vermont) – website
  • Region 4 VPPPA 2012 Conference (June 19-21 @ Chattanooga, Tennessee) – website
  • 28th Annual National VPPPA Conference (August 20-23 @ Anaheim, California) – website

I spoke to an OSHA rulemaker who is working on the long-storied Combustible Dust Safety Rule that has been in the works for over 2 years now (Link to CTI’s Blog on the ANPR).  The latest news I was told is that the proposed rule is scheduled to move to a Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (SBREFA) review panel in December of 2011.    

Continue reading “OSHA Combustible Dust Rule Moving Forward”

On May 13, 2011, OSHA held an Expert Forum on Combustible Dust to discuss possible options for developing a comprehensive rule to address the hazards associated with combustible dust.  OSHA’s stated intent was to both protect employees and be cost-effective for employers. The major topics for discussion included: Scope; Focus on Preventing Secondary Explosions; Existing Facilities; and Multiple Layers of Protection. The meeting was divided into these four topics for discussion, and OSHA posed questions from each to the panel of experts. Below are the highlights from the meeting.

Continue reading “Summary of OSHA Combustible Dust Forum”

The engineers here at CTI have had great success over the past several years in reducing risks associated with combustible dust fires and explosions.  Much of our work has focused on hazard analysis, design of fire and explosion prevention and protection systems, and safety procedures and training.  But there is another field we have been working on that I feel is worth discussing – mechanical design of equipment and processes to eliminate fugitive dust.

Continue reading “Reducing Fugitive Dust Emissions from Process Equipment”