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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires all employees who are exposed to noise levels with a time-weighted average of 85-decibels or more to be included in a hearing conservation program. These employees must receive audiograms on an annual basis to determine if they experience a certain level of hearing loss known as a “Standard Threshold Shift”. In addition, the facility must also evaluate feasible administrative or engineering controls to reduce employee noise exposure for all employees who are exposed to noise levels at or above OSHA’s permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 90-decibels. If no additional controls are employed, then those employees exposed to noise levels above the OSHA PEL must wear hearing protectors. It is important to remember that, according to OSHA’s Hierarchy of Controls, the use of PPE is the last step to reducing an employee’s exposure to high levels of noise, after engineering and administrative controls. Continue reading “Are Your Noise Monitoring Results Still Valid?”

CTI’s Director of Engineering, Brian Edwards, joined Dr. Chris Cloney, the Managing Director and Lead Researcher at DustEx Research, to discuss the history of OSHA’s National Emphasis Program (NEP) on combustible dust.  In this free, 45 minutes podcast, you can hear Brian and Chris discuss:

  • The origin of the combustible dust NEP
  • The programs and regulations that were in place before the NEP
  • The OSHA rulemaking process
  • The challenges of establishing a national standard
  • How OSHA is currently regulating combustible dust standards

DSS045: History of the OSHA Combustible Dust National Emphasis Program with Brian Edwards

If you have any questions related to the NEP or combustible dust safety, you can contact Brian at bedwards@conversiontechnology.com.

On September 6, 2019, the EPA published a proposed amendment to what is commonly referred to as the Plywood or Kiln MACT. This proposed amendment does not address lumber kiln emission standards. EPA has stated that the lumber kiln emission and work practice standards will be addressed in a later proposed amendment.

This proposed amendment to 40 CFR 63, Subpart DDDD: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Plywood and Composite Wood Products (PCWP) is based on the completion of the residual risk and technology review. The review has found that no revisions are necessary to the current controls in the original rule. The rule does propose removal of the startup, shutdown, and malfunctions plans as EPA has deemed this to be sufficiently addressed in the work practice standards of the regulation, as well as by the Clean Air Act (CAA).

The proposed rule is open to comments until October 21, 2019. All submissions must include Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2016-0243-0034. The EPA encourages that comments be submitted through the Federal eRulemaking Portal located at https://www.regulations.gov/.

If you need help identifying how this proposed rule change will affect your facility or need assistance with providing comments to the EPA, please contact us at (770) 263-6330 or cti@conversiontechnology.com.

COMBUSTIBLE DUST SEMINAR  |  September 19TH  |  Kansas City, MO

Conversion Technology, Inc. has teamed up with the Fike Corporation and CST  to co-host an educational seminar on the ever-growing topic of dust hazards, NFPA Compliance, design approaches and retrofit issues.

 Breakfast and lunch will be provided.  Immediately following the presentations there will be a LIVE EXPLOSION DEMO!

 *Registered attendees who have completed, signed and returned the required forms will be transported to the Fike Corporation remote test site facility for the live demonstration. 

 ✅ REGISTER today via email to dusthazardseminar@cstindustries.com

 For more information on Combustible Dust Hazards, please visit us at conversiontechnology.com or call us at 770-263-6330.

 #combustibledust #dusthazards #dusttesting #NFPA #educationalseminar #education #seminar

 * Additional approvals may be required prior to attending. You must wear closed-toe shoes. Eye and ear protection will be provided. No photos or videos may be taken at the remote test site.

 

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is an organization tasked with developing and maintaining fire protection and life safety standards in the United States and worldwide. In addition to subjects such as sprinkler design, flammable liquid storage, and emergency exit requirements, NFPA has standards that deal specifically with combustible dust; a topic that CTI has been focused on for over a decade.  There are several NFPA Standards that address combustible dust: NFPA 652 – Standard on the Fundamentals of Combustible Dust, is the overarching standard that applies to all facilities, and there are also several commodity-specific dust standards (e.g. 61 for agricultural and food, 664 for wood products, 484 for metals). CTI is a principal member of the NFPA 61 Technical Committee for Agricultural Dust and has worked with several of the other committees. All of these standards are changing, and CTI is here to help our clients understand what that will mean for them. Continue reading “Changes to Combustible Dust Standards”

In order to keep employees safe while handling hazardous waste, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) has developed the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard (HAZWOPER), written in 29 CFR 1910.120. These regulations identify information and training requirements that facilities must comply with to keep employees safe during emergency response involving hazardous chemicals. Continue reading “HAZWOPER Requirements for Small Quantity Generators”

Come say hello to Adam Haroz, one of CTI’s Engineering Managers, as he will be speaking at this year’s Region IV VPPPA Conference in Chattanooga, TN on June 19th.

Adam Haroz will be discussing how the regulations governing industrial machinery have shifted the need for conducting risk assessments on robotic systems from a good practice to now a mandatory requirement. The discussion will emphasize the benefits of conducting an on-site risk assessment. It will also highlight the need to identify the hazards and assess the potential risks associated with robot operations when selecting and designing safeguarding measures. He will review the methodology for conducting a risk assessment for different robotic systems, as well as other industrial equipment, how to assess the adequacy of current safeguards, and methods for determining the risk reduction measures required.

The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is designed to encourage cooperative efforts between employees, management and OSHA for the purpose of improving workplace safety and health. The VPP concept recognizes that workplace safety and health can be enforced in a compliance atmosphere and can be enhanced in a cooperative atmosphere. OSHA recognizes and partners with worksites that demonstrate excellence in Safety and Health.

Region IV VPPPA is the region that serves the eight Southeast states. (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee)

For more information on the VPPA or to register for the Region IV VPPA Conference click the following link: http://www.regionivvppconference.com/

The Emission Inventory for Georgia facilities is due to the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GAEPD) by June 30, 2019. This is for the mandatory reporting of facility emissions that occurred in calendar year 2018. This is part of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The NEI is developed during three-year cycle reporting periods, where all Title V (or Part 70) permitted sources will be required to report at least every third year. The other two years only comprise larger sources with greater emission potentials. The 2017 emission inventory required all Title V sources to report. The 2018 inventory due this year, and the 2019 inventory that will be due in 2020, is for the larger Title V sources only. Continue reading “Air Emission Inventory Due End of June”

Tue, Jun 11, 2019 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

Explosive Dust NFPA Safety Standard Is Coming; Are Employers Ready?

Combustible dust poses one of the highest safety risks in business. A catastrophic explosion can destroy a company and simply abating combustible dust violations after an OSHA inspection can approach $1 million or more. Industries, such as food processing, wood, chemical, plastics, and metals are regularly affected. If you have baghouses, vacuums or dust collectors, you may be affected. The National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) standard 652 is an effort to produce a consistent approach to combustible dust compliance. While the NFPA standard is not a government regulation, employers are scrambling to complete a Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA) and abate hazards by September 7, 2020.

National authority, Brian Edwards will provide experience-tested descriptions of common employer challenges and practical approaches. Howard Mavity will also lead discussion of legal issues and highlight how an expert and counsel effectively collaborate. We’ll discuss how the expert sifts through the multiple applicable consensus standards, and state and local ordinances to come up with the best approach; often less costly than first anticipated, as well as how to approach the crucial Dust Hazard Analysis.

Register Now Add to Calendar