News

On December 12, 2018, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) began to enforce compliance with the updated Beryllium Rule that went into effect on May 20, 2017. The purpose of this updated Rule is to limit employee exposure to beryllium, which is known to cause lung cancer and other chronic beryllium disease. Continue reading “Updates to the OSHA Beryllium Standard”

Industrial Stormwater Permitting requirements have been in place for over 20 years. Facilities that fall under one of eleven industry categories identified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and have material handling and storage, equipment maintenance and cleaning, and other activities exposed to stormwater are required to have a permit to discharge their stormwater runoff. Stormwater runoff is generated from rain and snowmelt events that flow over land or impervious surfaces, such as paved streets, parking lots, and building rooftops, and does not soak into the ground. The runoff picks up pollutants like trash, chemicals, oils, and dirt/sediment that can harm our rivers, streams, lakes, and coastal waters. Most often, industrial facilities are covered under General Permits issued by the State, but some facilities have individual permits. Continue reading “Industrial Stormwater Compliance – Increased Focus from Regulators”

Robots have been a part of the industrial landscape for decades. As the world of industrial automation progresses, the number of employees and robots working in close quarters with each other continues to grow. With the increase in automation and the use of mobile and industrial robots, regulations are being updated to address the potential hazards posed by the changes in equipment and routine and non-routine tasks around robots in the workplace. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is training their inspectors to be aware of these regulatory changes and become familiar with industrial robot use. Not being aware of your facility’s requirements or of the changes in robot regulations could cost you. Continue reading “Are You at Risk of OSHA Citations for Robot Safety?”

For many industrial facilities, staying on top of the numerous and ever changing Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations can be difficult and sometimes frustrating. One area that we have seen many facilities having issues with is following the regulations and requirements associated with the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA regulations are those that govern the management of hazardous waste, solid waste, bio-hazardous waste, and universal waste. In this article, we will explore some of the most common mistakes made within general industry when handling, storing, and generating waste streams, and potential violations that are the result of these mistakes. Continue reading “Common Mistakes in Handling Waste”

On January 17, 2017, The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated their Walking-Working Surfaces and Fall Protection standards. While most of the changes to the rule have already been put into effect, several provisions have delayed effective dates, many of which are coming up soon. Is your facility ready to comply with these new rule changes? Continue reading “Is Your Facility Ready For The Updated OSHA Ladder Rules?”

Norcross, GA – Building on its 30+ year legacy as a leading environmental and safety engineering firm, CTI (Conversion Technology, Inc.) announces a new and exciting strategic partnership with industrial safety solutions manufacturer, Fike and the world’s leading bolted steel tank, silo and aluminum dome manufacturer, CST Industries.

CTI’s partnership with Fike and CST will provide the ultimate comprehensive dust explosion solutions for compliance with the new regulation for Combustible Dust, NFPA 652. The regulation covers a wide range of types of combustible dust used in many application areas across just about all the major industrial and agricultural markets. Continue reading “CTI, Fike and CST Join Forces to Address Combustible Dust and NFPA 652 Regulations”

Changes to EPA “Once In Always In” Policy for MACT Rules

On January 25th 2018, the EPA released a guidance memo reversing the “Once in Always in” (OIAI) policy regarding the classification of major source facilities subject to MACT (Maximum Achievable Control Technology) standards. A major source is defined as any facility which emits at least 10 tons of any Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP), or 25 tons of any combination of HAPs. This policy, which has been in place since 1995, stated that any major source that becomes subject to a MACT rule must stay in compliance with that rule permanently, even if the facility finds a way to drop emissions below major source thresholds. Continue reading “Federal, State, and Local Changes to Air Permitting Requirements”

While some facilities, typically with a corporate hierarchy, regularly conduct internal audits or answer internal questionnaires about their environmental and safety practice, it is not very common for a facility to have a review of all permits, programs, procedures, and equipment to make sure that they follow all federal, state, and local regulations and requirements. We recommend for all facilities to conduct periodical Environmental and Safety Compliance Reviews (ESCR) either with an internal team or by a third party. 

The ESCR should include a review of permit and recordkeeping requirements, procedures and SOPs, and employee training. The review should also include a physical walkthrough of the facility and process lines to identify any gaps in safety and environmental compliance. The ESCR can also be conducted in conjunction with global and corporate standards, management systems, as well as specified internal auditing procedures. The ESCR will not only identify gaps in compliance but will allow for the team to prioritize the abatement of the gaps based on capital investment required, time allocations, and employee and environmental safety. It is recommended the ESCR be conducted twice a year, or, at a minimum, once a year.

Some of the benefits of conducting regular ESCRs are as follows: Continue reading “Periodical Environmental and Safety Compliance Reviews are a Good Business Practice”

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) new rule for respirable crystalline silica went into effect on June 23, 2018. Prior regulations for silica were deemed to be outdated as new research regarding the negative health effects of respirable silica has been conducted. Exposure to high concentrations of silica dust can occur in the construction industry, precast construction and fabrication, concrete product manufacturing, and more. Workers who inhale small crystalline silica particles are at risk of developing severe illnesses, including silicosis (an incurable lung disease that could lead to disability or death), lung cancer, and kidney disease.


Continue reading “Are You In Compliance with OSHA’s New Silica Rule?”