Adam Haroz, our Director of Engineering, will be presenting at this year’s International Robotics Safety Conference in Columbus, OH on 9/28/2022. He will be speaking from a consultant’s perspective on a panel to discuss the safety in installation and commissioning of robotic systems. He will give e brief introduction to the topic and then will identify key tips on robotic system safety, and things that tend to get overlooked in the commissioning of the system. If you have any questions regarding robotic safety or are interested in hearing the panel discussion please contact CTI at cti@conversiontechnology.com.

Learn more and register at https://www.automate.org/events/international-robot-safety-conference-2022

 

Staying in compliance and ensuring the proper management of wastewater discharges from industrial facilities can be challenging. The possible impediments that a facility can face are dependent on several factors such as the location of the facility, existing infrastructure, and the facility’s financial forecast. One of the most important first steps to maintaining wastewater compliance involves properly identifying the different wastewater streams at a facility. Wastewater discharges generally fall into one of two categories, Domestic and Industrial. Domestic wastewater discharges come from bathrooms, kitchens, and hand-washing stations and can be characterized as wastewater from personal usage. Industrial wastewater discharges come from industrial and commercial sources and may contain pollutants at levels that could impact water quality and/or interfere with Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW). Industrial discharges are usually generated from different types of industrial processes and are typically segregated from domestic discharges as described above. Continue reading “Management of Wastewater Discharges from Industrial Facilities”

Every year, federal regulations require that all state agencies responsible for regulating air pollution collect emissions data from certain facilities in order to compile an Emission Inventory (EI). In Georgia, emissions data for Calendar Year 2021 are due by June 30, 2022. All Title V facilities whose potential to emit (PTE) emissions is equal to or exceeds the following thresholds in Calendar Year 2021 are required to submit emissions data: Continue reading “Georgia Emission Inventories for Calendar Year 2021”

Congratulations to PH Haroz, President of CTI, for completing a bucket list item of running a marathon in all 50 United States and on all 7 continents. He completed a marathon in Antarctica in December of 2021 and became a member of the exclusive 7 Continents Marathon Club.

Antarctic Ice Marathon 2021
Antarctic Ice Marathon 2021

This quest was 12 years in the making. He is not even close to being finished with running, and the CTI family look forward to cheering him on with pride for many more runs to come.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) in 1986. This act was created by Congress through Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) to help communities plan for and manage chemical emergencies. This act implemented several reporting requirements on most industrial facilities throughout the U.S. These reporting requirements are most commonly known as SARA Reporting. In this article, we will discuss the most common of the SARA Reports and Notifications and what your facility may need to do about each of them. These Reports include: Sections 302, 303, 304, 311, 312, and 313.

Continue reading “How to Stay in Compliance with SARA Title III Regulations”

A new year always brings changes to health and safety regulations and requirements. The number of OSHA inspections increased in 2021 from the previous year, and this trend is likely to continue into 2022. It is therefore imperative to ensure that your facility’s safety programs are up to date, safety training is being routinely conducted, and records are being properly kept. A good way to ensure that the safety programs are in order is to conduct a thorough safety audit of all programs, procedures, trainings, and records to ensure that the facility is in compliance with OSHA requirements.

In 2022, OSHA is expected to focus on heat illness prevention. As global temperatures continue to rise, it can be easy to succumb to job-related heat stress while working. Heat is the leading cause of death among all weather-related phenomena, and excessive heat can cause heat stroke or exacerbate existing health problems like asthma, kidney failure, and heart disease. Because of this, OSHA announced that it will begin implementing an enforcement initiative on heat-related hazards and will develop a National Emphasis Program (NEP) on heat inspections. OSHA area directors are expected to perform the following: Continue reading “What to Expect from OSHA in 2022”

What is the General Stormwater Permit?

Most facilities that conduct industrial activity exposed to stormwater are familiar with the NPDES Industrial Storm Water General Permit and are aware that it is issued by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD). The current General Stormwater Permit was issued in March 2017 and will continue through May 2022. This is the earliest effective date for reissuance of the permit. Facilities with a permit are authorized to discharge stormwater associated with industrial activity to the waters of the state of Georgia in accordance with the limitations, monitoring requirements and other conditions set forth in the permit.

What is the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan? Continue reading “Staying in Compliance with Your General Stormwater Permit”

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) maintains a full-time staff of inspection officers, called compliance safety and health officers (CSHO). OSHA has jurisdiction over most worksites and can enforce the rules and regulations pertaining to the specific industry of the worksite. These rules and regulations can be found in your industry’s specific standards. For general industry, these standards are 29 CFR 1910 (General Industry Standards). For construction, these standards are 29 CFR 1926 (Construction Industry Standards).

An OSHA inspection can be conducted either on-site or by phone/fax. During an on-site inspection, the CSHO may walk through portions of the worksite, will review worksite injury and illness records, and will observe the posting of the official OSHA poster. The inspector is also very likely to interview employees privately, without management present, to discuss site safety.

These inspections can occur for several reasons. Inspections are prioritized for worksites in the following order of priority: Continue reading “Are Third Party Safety Inspections The Best Course of Action for My Facility?”

Many facilities in the food and agriculture industry have processes that handle combustible dusts and powders. Because of this, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has developed several standards to help facilities have safely manage combustible dust and associated hazards. Many of these standards are commodity-specific standards that are developed to give specific industries combustible dust standards that are based on their types of operation equipment, and the input from those that know the most about those processes and materials. Facilities in the food and agriculture industry should refer to NFPA 61: Standard for Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities which was recently updated in 2020. One primary requirement listed in NFPA 61 is the need for facilities to conduct a Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA) by January 1, 2022.

What is a DHA? Continue reading “NFPA 61 Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA) Deadline Is Approaching”