Norcross, GA – Building on its 30+ year legacy as a leading environmental and safety engineering firm, CTI (Conversion Technology, Inc.) announces a new and exciting strategic partnership with industrial safety solutions manufacturer, Fike and the world’s leading bolted steel tank, silo and aluminum dome manufacturer, CST Industries.

CTI’s partnership with Fike and CST will provide the ultimate comprehensive dust explosion solutions for compliance with the new regulation for Combustible Dust, NFPA 652. The regulation covers a wide range of types of combustible dust used in many application areas across just about all the major industrial and agricultural markets. Continue reading “CTI, Fike and CST Join Forces to Address Combustible Dust and NFPA 652 Regulations”

Changes to EPA “Once In Always In” Policy for MACT Rules

On January 25th 2018, the EPA released a guidance memo reversing the “Once in Always in” (OIAI) policy regarding the classification of major source facilities subject to MACT (Maximum Achievable Control Technology) standards. A major source is defined as any facility which emits at least 10 tons of any Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP), or 25 tons of any combination of HAPs. This policy, which has been in place since 1995, stated that any major source that becomes subject to a MACT rule must stay in compliance with that rule permanently, even if the facility finds a way to drop emissions below major source thresholds. Continue reading “Federal, State, and Local Changes to Air Permitting Requirements”

While some facilities, typically with a corporate hierarchy, regularly conduct internal audits or answer internal questionnaires about their environmental and safety practice, it is not very common for a facility to have a review of all permits, programs, procedures, and equipment to make sure that they follow all federal, state, and local regulations and requirements. We recommend for all facilities to conduct periodical Environmental and Safety Compliance Reviews (ESCR) either with an internal team or by a third party. 

The ESCR should include a review of permit and recordkeeping requirements, procedures and SOPs, and employee training. The review should also include a physical walkthrough of the facility and process lines to identify any gaps in safety and environmental compliance. The ESCR can also be conducted in conjunction with global and corporate standards, management systems, as well as specified internal auditing procedures. The ESCR will not only identify gaps in compliance but will allow for the team to prioritize the abatement of the gaps based on capital investment required, time allocations, and employee and environmental safety. It is recommended the ESCR be conducted twice a year, or, at a minimum, once a year.

Some of the benefits of conducting regular ESCRs are as follows: Continue reading “Periodical Environmental and Safety Compliance Reviews are a Good Business Practice”

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) new rule for respirable crystalline silica went into effect on June 23, 2018. Prior regulations for silica were deemed to be outdated as new research regarding the negative health effects of respirable silica has been conducted. Exposure to high concentrations of silica dust can occur in the construction industry, precast construction and fabrication, concrete product manufacturing, and more. Workers who inhale small crystalline silica particles are at risk of developing severe illnesses, including silicosis (an incurable lung disease that could lead to disability or death), lung cancer, and kidney disease.


Continue reading “Are You In Compliance with OSHA’s New Silica Rule?”

Title: Practical Solutions to Combustible Dust Compliance
Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2018
Time: 01:30 PM Eastern Standard Time
Duration: 1.5 hours
Register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1622114293951139331

Combustible dust poses one of the highest safety risks to a surprising variety of industries; some do not realize that their processes and materials generate combustible dust and could trigger a deadly explosion or even costly six-figure OSHA fines. Some studies have claimed that the average cost of abating combustible dust violations after an inspection is approaching $1 million. Industries, such as food, wood, chemical, plastics, and metals are regularly affected, but if you have baghouses and dust collectors, you may be affected as well. Continue reading “Free Webinar: Practical Solutions to Combustible Dust Compliance”