By Chris Frendahl

Your facility’s Lockout/Tagout program is essential in ensuring employee safety while performing maintenance on energized equipment. Countless workplace fatalities and severe injuries have resulted from improper Lockout/Tagout procedures. OSHA regulations listed in 29 CFR 1910.147 requires all industrial facilities to develop and maintain a written Lockout/Tagout program that lists procedures for safely isolating equipment from all energy sources prior to servicing the equipment.  Here are 3 tips for ensuring that your Lockout/Tagout program is effective and compliant with OSHA regulations. Continue reading “Is Your Lockout/Tagout Program Effective? Three Tips to Developing a Compliant Program”

Adam Haroz, EIT

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) is getting more stringent, both with regulations and enforcement, on machine guarding violations. They are targeting industries with higher risks of potential injuries from machinery. Despite this move by OSHA towards greater expectations from industry, there is still a large cultural gap between employers and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) regarding who is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the machinery is guarded in compliance with OSHA regulations. Continue reading ““But It Came That Way”: The Roles, Responsibilities, and Accountability of Machine Guarding”

As of January 1st, 2015, the updated standards for injury & illness reporting officially came into effect. There are some slight changes to the standard that affect a large number of employers.

Under the old rule, employers were required to notify OSHA only of workplace fatalities or if three or more employees had to go to the hospital due to workplace injury or illness. According to the updated standard, employers must notify OSHA of the following: Continue reading “OSHA’s New Incident Reporting Requirements”

As a new year is upon us, it is once again time for reflection, new goals, areas of improvement, and it is time to be introduced to OSHA’s plans and expectations for 2015.

Depending on whom you are talking to, OSHA’s plans for 2015 and beyond are either ambitious and will drastically enhance worker safety in all industries, or OSHA has a weak agenda that alienates employers and fails to address the safety and health of the American worker. Read the rest of this article and decide for yourself. Either way, 2015 will be an important year to keep up with OSHA. Continue reading “What to Expect From OSHA in 2015”

Flame resistant clothing (FRC) has been used for years in a number of industries to protect workers from flash fires, arc flash, embers, molten metal, and other potential sources of ignition to clothing.  The reason FRC is so important is that many fatalities have occurred because a worker’s clothing has caught on fire, exposing him/her to burning heat for a much longer time than would have occurred during the initial event (e.g. arc flash, vapor flash fire).  Continue reading “Conversion Technology engineers to wear FRC when conducting Combustible Dust Hazard Analysis”

The new Globally Harmonized System (GHS) is upon us. OSHA, with help from the U.N. and global community, has updated the HazCom Standard in an effort to standardize and simplify the communication of chemical hazards. Before this new system, a worker handling drums of flammable material from different manufacturers could notice an array of different warning labels. One manufacturer could have labeled the material as “Flammable”, while another could have labeled it as “Extremely Flammable” or even “Caution Flammable Vapors”. The material is all the same, but now there is confusion as to the level of the hazard present. It is for this reason why the GHS is here.

Continue reading “OSHA GHS Deadline Approaching Fast…Are You Ready?”

Over the Summer of 2012, Brian Edwards, PE, Director of Engineering for CTI, had the opportunity to speak at 5 regional conferences of the OSHA Voluntary Protection Program Participants Association (VPPPA), as well as the 2012 National VPPPA conference.   Video from the Region 4 conference in Chattanooga, TN has been posted on Youtube.

[embedyt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFi-RwNLkLM[/embedyt]

Please check out the presentation here:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFi-RwNLkLM