On July 29, 2016, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled on the lawsuits over EPA’s Boiler MACT (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart DDDDD) and Boiler GACT (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart JJJJJJ) regulations. The lawsuit was the consolidation of multiple suits from industry and environmental groups. The split of the suits from industry versus environmental groups was stated by the court to be approximately 50/50. In summary, the court rejected all the industry petitions and granted some of the petitions from environmental groups. The most significant aspects of this ruling pertain to vacating portions of the standard and remanding additional portions of the standard to EPA to provide further explanation.

Under the Boiler MACT regulation, boilers are divided into subcategories based on the type of fuel utilized and the configuration of the combustion unit. Continue reading “Court Rules on Lawsuit over EPA’s Boiler MACT Regulation”

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule to protect workers from exposure to respirable crystalline silica. The rule is comprised of two standards, one for Construction (1926.1153) and one for General Industry (1910.1053). Before going into the details of the final rules, here is a review of what crystalline silica is and why a new rule governing exposure to it is being pushed out. Continue reading “OSHA Releases Final Rule on Silica Exposure Requirements”

It feels like we have been talking about the enacting of the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for years, probably because we have been discussing the different aspects and implementation plans since it came out in 2012. The last deadline for compliance with this regulation is almost here. With the three-year transition period for full implementation of this regulation ending on June 1, 2016, this standard and its components should be at the fore front of our minds. Continue reading “Final GHS Deadline Is Almost Here!”

By Nash Skipper, EIT

Every three years, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) selects National Enforcement Initiatives to devote additional resources in order to focus on specific issues with high levels of non-compliance that the agency believes can be improved by additional enforcement at the federal level. For fiscal years 2017-2019, EPA has selected seven initiatives. Five current initiatives will be continued, with one of these being expanded in scope, and two new initiatives have been targeted for increased focus. These initiatives span several key environmental categories, including water, hazardous chemicals, air, and energy extraction. Continue reading “EPA Announces National Enforcement Initiatives”

Under the previous EPA Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials (NHSM) rule, treated wood was prohibited from being used as boiler fuel; however, EPA recently issued an amendment permitting creosote-treated wood to be used as boiler fuel under special conditions.

Read the rest of our article in Waste Advantage Magazine online (http://goo.gl/8idkTR) or in the April 2016 digital edition (http://www.mazdigital.com/webreader/38250?page=35).

IIAROn December 3, 2015, the International Institute of Ammonia Refrigeration (IIAR) published the new ANSI/IIAR 2-2014: American National Standard for Safe Design of Closed-Circuit Ammonia Refrigeration Systems. This standard replaces the 2008 edition of the standard. This is IIAR’s first comprehensive safety standard and was written specifically for adoption by code making bodies. This change sees the new standard written using enforceable language. Informative topics and guidance are now included in appendices. Historically, ANSI/IIAR 2 has served as the recognized and generally acceptable good engineering practices (RAGAGEP) for safe design and compliance for ammonia refrigeration facilities subject to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Process Safety Management (PSM) and the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Risk Management Plan (RMP). This won’t change with the new standard; however, we could see a more formal adoption of the standard by OSHA and EPA.

Continue reading “IIAR Publishes New Standard for Ammonia Refrigeration Systems”

On January 18, 2016, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) published the 2nd draft report for NFPA 499: Recommended Practice for the Classification of Combustible Dusts and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas. It is now open for a Notice of Intent to Make a Motion (NITMAM) until February 19, 2016 for those on a Committee Comment, Second Revision, or Second Correlating Revision. The purpose of NFPA 499 is to provide information on classifying combustible dusts and locations and provide recommended practices on proper selection of electrical equipment in hazardous (classified) locations per NFPA 70, National Electrical Code. NFPA 499 is a compendium document to Chapter 5 (Article 500) of NFPA 70 and does not supersede any requirements of other NFPA standards (e.g. NFPA 61, 68, 69, 654, 664, etc.).

The significant changes for the 2016 revision includes classifications and definitions for the following: Continue reading “NFPA 499 Revision Update”

In September 2015, the USEPA published proposed, revised rules under the title, “Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements”. Initially, a public comment period ending November 24, 2015 was established, but the comment period has been extended until Dec. 24, 2015.  The new rules are meant to clarify and streamline the regulations, but they also include additional labeling and recordkeeping requirements for some.   Continue reading “EPA Extends Comment Period on the New Hazardous Waste Rules”

Title: NFPA 652 – The New Standard for Combustible Dust
Date: Thursday, December 03, 2015
Time: 02:00 PM Eastern Standard Time
Duration: 1 hour

In 2015, The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) released NFPA 652, a new, overarching standard for combustible dust that covers all materials – agricultural products, wood products, chemicals, etc. Continue reading “Free Webinar: NFPA 652 – The New Standard for Combustible Dust”