News

By Joshua Haar, EIT

The US EPA has revised the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground level ozone. This will impact new and existing industrial facilities in some locations.

Background

The NAAQS were implemented as part of the Clean Air Act in the 1970’s to protect public health from a variety of pollutants, including particulates, carbon monoxide, and ozone, among others. The ozone NAAQS were instituted to limit the health effects (e.g. reduced lung function and pulmonary inflammation) caused by ground level ozone in the atmosphere; effects that primarily impact children, older adults, and people with asthma or other lung diseases. While ozone in the stratosphere helps block harmful radiation from reaching the surface of the earth, ozone at ground level is harmful. Specifically, it is not easily removed by our upper respiratory tract and is absorbed in our lungs, where it can cause narrowing of airways and decrease lung function. Continue reading “New Primary and Secondary Ozone NAAQS Requirements”

By Chris Frendahl

Your facility’s Lockout/Tagout program is essential in ensuring employee safety while performing maintenance on energized equipment. Countless workplace fatalities and severe injuries have resulted from improper Lockout/Tagout procedures. OSHA regulations listed in 29 CFR 1910.147 requires all industrial facilities to develop and maintain a written Lockout/Tagout program that lists procedures for safely isolating equipment from all energy sources prior to servicing the equipment.  Here are 3 tips for ensuring that your Lockout/Tagout program is effective and compliant with OSHA regulations. Continue reading “Is Your Lockout/Tagout Program Effective? Three Tips to Developing a Compliant Program”

Permittees under the Georgia Industrial Storm Water General Permit must Document If there  are any floor drains in the production area and/or sinks that are not in the bathroom, kitchen, breakroom, etc. If any of these are present at the facility, an evaluation is required.

The evaluation includes: Continue reading “Smoke and Dye Test for Permittees under the Georgia Storm Water Permit”

Boiler Area Source applies to a boiler in a facility with actual emissions of Hazardous Air  Pollutants (HAP) less than 10 tons per year of any single HAP or less than 25 tons per year of all HAPs combined. EPA allows Boiler Area Source facilities the use of Generally Available Control Technologies (GACT) or management practices to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutant (as compared to Boiler MACT facilities explained later requiring stricter practices). If your facility is an Area Source, you should have submitted the Initial Notification Report and Notification of Compliance Status to the State and US EPA by May 31, 2013. Continue reading “Meeting Compliance Schedule and Requirements for Boiler MACT”

Adam Haroz, EIT

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) is getting more stringent, both with regulations and enforcement, on machine guarding violations. They are targeting industries with higher risks of potential injuries from machinery. Despite this move by OSHA towards greater expectations from industry, there is still a large cultural gap between employers and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) regarding who is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the machinery is guarded in compliance with OSHA regulations. Continue reading ““But It Came That Way”: The Roles, Responsibilities, and Accountability of Machine Guarding”

We would like to congratulate our Director of Engineering, Brian Edwards, for being appointed as a Principle on the NFPA Technical Committee on Agricultural Dusts (CMD-AGR), which is the committee that maintains NFPA 61- Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities.  As a consultant to industry with over 16 years experience,  Brian will sit on the committee as a Special Expert.

We’re very excited to launch the newly designed and developed Conversion Technology, Inc. website. This is a soft launch. We’ll continue to add and adjust our content and functionality over the next few weeks.

One of the main goals of the redesign involves accessibility. Our end goal is a site that’s easy to navigate, with content that’s easy to understand.

Corporate health, safety and sustainability isn’t always easy to achieve, nor is it easy to describe online. The information we share here is vital to running your business effectively and safely.

There are many rules and regulations that you must follow. You’re required to keep your workplace safe, by law. We’re here for you to turn to when you’ve got questions and concerns about the safety of your employees, equipment and more.

Do you worry that you’re not doing all you can to reduce your environmental footprint? Are you concerned about unknown hazards in your workplace? Do you find yourself feeling less than ready for your upcoming OSHA inspection?

Running a business isn’t easy.  Running a business that meets OSHA guidelines is even more difficult. It’s important to know who you can turn to when you need information and assistance. We want you to turn to Conversion Technology, Inc. when you have questions. We want you to bookmark this website as a resource as you strive to comply with safety and health regulations..

What can we do to make this website an even more valuable resource? What’s missing? What would you like to see as we continue to adjust the site before our hard launch? With your assistance we can make the new Conversion Technology, Inc. website a valuable and effective resource for your business.

Feel free to leave a comment below, letting us know how our company, and our website, can better serve your needs.

 

The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and US Army Core of Engineers (USACE) have issued a revised regulation to define what qualifies as Waters of the United States (WOTUS), and this will become effective on August 28, 2015. The new definition is an attempt by the USEPA and USACE to determine their jurisdictional limits in what has become an ambiguous regulatory framework thanks to two Supreme Court cases in 2001 and 2006.

The new definition will not: Continue reading “Waters of the United States”