News

The US EPA mailed the ICR by registered mail to 391 facilities in the PCWP industry that are major sources for hazardous air pollutants (HAP) regulated by the PCWP NESHAP and synthetic area sources that may have used technology to avoid major source status triggering National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) applicability.

 Recipients are asked to complete the ICR by February 9, 2018.

Continue reading “The EPA Information Collection Request (ICR) for Plywood and Composite Wood Products (PCWP) Was Mailed by the EPA and is Due February 9, 2018”

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has submitted an information collection request (ICR), for the “Plywood Composite Wood Products National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Risk  and Technology Review (RTR)” (Kiln MACT) to the office of Management and Budget (OMB) for preview and approval.

This Kiln MACT applies to every sawmill that is a Major Source or Synthetic Minor Source for Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP).

The ICR will be sent to all known operators of PCWP facilities that are major sources for hazardous air pollutants (HAP) regulated by the PCWP NESHAP and synthetic area sources that may have used technology to avoid major source status triggering NESHAP applicability. The information collection seeks to collect facility-level information (e.g. facility name, location, contact information, and process unit details), emissions information, compliance data, control information, and descriptions of technological innovations.

The EPA will either establish an emission limit or work practices in order to minimize emissions for process units included in the PCWP MACT source category. Capturing, controlling, and the measurements of kiln emissions is not feasible. Installing emissions capture and add-on control equipment for VOC/HAP removal have not been identified. It is therefore predicted that facilities will choose to use work practice requirements in lieu of emission limits.

The purpose of work practices is to minimize HAP emissions. For most kiln schedules, the HAP emissions increase near the end of the drying cycle when the wood reaches its final moisture content. HAP emissions increase as the moisture content decreases.

If you operate a lumber kiln, you will need to develop a plan for minimizing HAP emissions from the lumber kiln(s) by minimizing the annual average variability in dried lumber moisture content. Plans must be required to be submitted to the appropriate regulatory agency with your Notice of Compliance Status and you will need to maintain appropriate records of compliance with the work practices.

Changes in kiln operating temperatures can significantly affect mill operations and drying capacity. Lower kiln temperatures result in longer drying times. This is a production and capacity issue for mills. A mill operating four lumber kilns at full capacity at 225OF would have to add two more lumber kilns to dry the same amount of lumber at 180OF. To overcome the potential Kiln MACT limitation, facilities will need to prepare a compliance work practice plan that minimizes emissions with the least affect to drying production.

Shortly Major Source and Synthetic Minor Source of HAPs will receive an ICR survey. You will have 120 days after ICR mailout to submit it. CTI is experienced in this area in assisting many lumber mills in the permitting process that includes most of the information requested in the survey. CTI also has assisted facilities with ICR for other regulations in the past.

Upon receipt of the ICR, feel free to contact us for a proposal to assist you to prepare it. If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact us.

After two rounds of public comments, the final version of Georgia’s General Multi-Sector Industrial Storm Water Permit (GAR050000) renewal has been issued. The permit will become effective on June 1, 2017. Covered industrial facilities will need to meet the following compliance deadlines:

All NOI’s and Annual Reports must now be submitted via Georgia EPD’s Online System (GEOS). Below are links to the final permit and to the GEOS website. If you have any questions or need assistance with submitting an NOI or updating or developing your SWPPP, please contact us.

New Georgia Multi-Sector Industrial Stormwater Permit – http://epd.georgia.gov/sites/epd.georgia.gov/files/related_files/site_page/FinalSigned2017IGP-20170306.pdf

GEOS Website – http://epd.georgia.gov/geos/

Georgia EPD’s NPDES Industrial Storm Water General Permits website – http://epd.georgia.gov/npdes-industrial-storm-water-general-permits

With the end of 2016 came many things. Of course we say hello to 2017, but we also start this year with a new President of the United States and many new members of our government. Under President Obama, a number of regulatory initiatives were achieved, including a rule on crystalline silica, an electronic submission of injury/illness data, and an increase in penalties from OSHA citations. The election of now President Donald Trump brings questions of what 2017 will bring for industry, employers, and the occupational safety and health policies and regulations across the board. I will go over what OSHA has published as its plans going forward in 2017, without the unknowns of a new administration. Keep in mind that some items may be moved on aggressively by OSHA before the new administration has time to step in and negate them. Continue reading “What to Expect from OSHA in 2017”

The first International Standard Organization (ISO) 14001, Environmental Management System (EMS) document was published in 1996 to provide a standard basis for all voluntary EMS’s to be certified as compliant systems by third party auditors. ISO14001 has since been revised twice, in 2004 and 2015, to make it more comprehensive and useful. In the newest revision, organizations and facilities can be certified under the 2004 standard for three years from the publication of the 2015 document. Therefore, organizations that wish to receive certification with ISO14001 have until September 2018 to update their EMS’s to be compliant with the 2015 revision. Continue reading “ISO-14001: Updating Your Environmental Management System”

One environmental reporting requirement that is often overlooked, but enforced regularly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GA EPD), and other state agencies is Tier II Reporting under the Superfund Amendments and Recovery Act (SARA).

If your facility stores any chemical or product on site that requires a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) (e.g. petroleum products, grains, paints, lead-acid batteries, liquid oxygen, etc.) in amounts over 10,000 pounds, your facility is required to notify the state, your local emergency planning committee, and the local fire department of these materials on an annual basis. Additionally, if you store any extremely hazardous substances (e.g. sulfuric acid) above its reportable quantity, usually 500 or 1,000 pounds, your facility is also required to report under the SARA Tier II requirements. The annual deadline to submit Tier II reports is March 1.

If you would like assistance determining whether or not your facility is required to report under the SARA Tier II requirements, or need assistance completing the reports, please give me a call at (770) 363-6330, x.113 or email me at jhaar@conversiontechnology.com.

Assessing risk has always played a vital role in the development and implementation of industrial machinery. Industrial robots, in particular, and other machinery are evolving, and therefore so are the needs and regulatory requirements for the identification and understanding of the risks involved in working with these machines. Thanks to the passage and enforcement of regulations governing the use of industrial machinery by organizations such as the Robotic Industry Association (RIA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the International Organization for Standards (ISO), conducting risk assessments on robotic systems and other machinery are not just good practices, they are mandatory. Continue reading “Risk Assessment Methodology for Robots and Other Machines”

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed to issue an Information Collection Request (ICR) for the Plywood and Composite Wood Products (PCWP) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), also known as the “PCWP MACT” or “Kiln MACT”. This is an important update for those in the lumber industry, as lumber drying kilns are one of the sources regulated under the standard. While the PCWP NESHAP covers many types of process units, this discussion will be primarily focused on the standard’s effect on sawmills operating lumber drying kilns.

 What is the history of the rule? Continue reading “EPA Proposes Collection of Information for “Kiln MACT””